PaceAcademe

This space is reserved for remarks, comments or analysis of any issue of concern to the Pace community. The Blog is NOT moderated and thus the adminstrator reserves the right to delete any posts that are deemed to be inappropriate either in tone or in contents. Discourse is encouraged as long as it remains civil and constructive. Let the games begin.

Monday, November 20, 2006

Whats Next?

Now that the response of the Board and that of the President have been delivered it is our turn to analyze , deliberate and then deliver a responsible position delineating what is to be the next move.
I will not take the time tonight to write a detailed analysis of either the message from the Board or the Presidents’ response to each of the ten resolutions that were passed by the Joint Faculty Council. Suffice it to say, that both responses and especially that of the Board is best judged as vacuous. Their brief message avoided dealing with the real issues, was preoccupied with obfuscation of the existential problems facing the institution, was anchored in denial of responsibility and indulged in misattribution of achievements.

Ultimately, however, it is what the faculty thinks that is important. We, at this blog, believe that it is the duty of all faculty members to make their views known. We look forward to hearing your views and ideas at the Westchester Faculty Council meeting tomorrow afternoon. Be there .

40 Comments:

At 9:21 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

So should we take a principled position although it stands no chance of success? Or is it more prudent to bite the bullit and accept the few gains in an effort to build on them?

jim

 
At 5:50 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thomas,
As a staff member I must say that your comment "Ultimately, however, it is what the faculty thinks that is important." is very revealing. I must also say it is a breath of fresh air. I think it is about time that the faculty stop using the students and claiming that they have their best interests at heart. Please be honest about the fact that, for most faculty, this fight is about faculty salaries and benefits and not about student rights.

 
At 6:10 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

HE DOES NOT DESERVE A SECOND CHANCE. BS IS BS and its stinks.

 
At 6:13 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

 
At 6:45 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

What Bianco & Caputo Company have now produced amounts to a defensive piece to cover their past bot as to their continued wrong doings and possible criminal acts.

And since somebody brought up the faculty’s salary as the main objective, there is nothing on that to be ashamed of, since the Pace faculty, on the average, year for year , are making substantially less than their high school teacher counterparts in the area. A univ professor on has in excess of ten years of college, in contrast to a high school teacher who has five.

 
At 7:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

subalterns................awake and BE HEARD!!!!!!!

 
At 7:02 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

ONE MORE TIME CHECK OUT THE CHAIRMAN AND KING'S PREPACE RELATIONS.

 
At 7:03 AM, Blogger avgjoey said...

NO RETREAT, BABY, NO SURRENDER!!!

 
At 7:06 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Leaders need followers!
by David Stanley - e-mail
spacer
Research shows that leadership only contributes about 20% to the success or failure of an organisation. Few of us spend much time thinking about the other side of the coin: what constitutes effective followership?
spacer
Leaders tend to get all the credit when things go right and none of the blame when they don’t. If we believe the hype, everything depends upon the great man at the top. In reality, of course, research shows that leadership only contributes about 20% to the success or failure of an organisation. (Source: Robert Kelley in the ‘Power of Followership’

We also forget that most leaders spend the majority of their time being led. The stereotypical, high profile, charismatic, full-time leader is a comparative rarity. Yet a disproportionate amount of the business literature, not to mention management development programmes, is devoted to leadership. Few of us spend much time thinking about the other side of the coin: what constitutes effective followership.


Maximising the quality of followership
The reason is not hard to find. Our culture has established a cult of leadership. To lead is to be independent, influential and visionary; to follow is the opposite. The very word reeks of weakness. But if followers contribute 80% to their organisation’s effectiveness, it is vital that we understand how to maximise the quality of followership.

But first we must face up to two uncomfortable truths. First, leadership is much easier if our followers are compliant and conformist – but then we will always be limited by our own capability. Being willing to embrace the discomfort of leading people who are unafraid to challenge, and want to contribute strengths that you do not possess yourself, is the key to optimising the full potential of your resources.

Secondly, it is well researched that people are more likely to get promoted in most organisations if they don’t rock the boat. Yet an enterprise which encourages rather than punishes constructive dissent will always be more innovative and will develop a sharper competitive edge.

Followers can bring out the best in leaders
33% of people in the UK say that they have never worked for an inspirational leader. But perhaps we are too quick to blame our leaders. Followers have far more influence than they realise. Leaders who are faced with people who are non-cooperative, independent and secretive will tend to become controlling and autocratic. Studies show that less than half of business leaders are able to instil trust in subordinates.

We really do get the bosses we deserve. Supportive, proactive and open team members will, however, bring out the best in their leaders – it’s a two-way process. Followers do not exist to serve leaders, but, enabled by effective leadership, to serve the purpose of the organisation. In fact, it has been proven that diverse groups of employees usually make better forecasts than so-called expert individuals (Source: Purdue University). Truly great leaders inspire this sense of partnership.

But, as always, what we practise is far more influential than what we preach. Only 1 in 7 leaders is someone that followers see as a potential role model to emulate. If effective followership is a mark of a healthy and purposeful organisation, how are we, as leaders, setting an example? Do we create a sense of alienation by undermining and scoring points off our superiors, or do we demonstrate the engagement and critical thinking that we want to encourage from our own followers?


© Copyright Caret 2006

 
At 7:53 AM, Blogger Thomas Paine said...

Annonymous 5:50
I am stunned at your naieve level of analysis. If you only had bothered to read this blog then you would have discovered what was said over and over again. The faculty have a moral duty, an obligation to save an institution of higher learning NOT because it is a means of making a living but because it is part of who they are, they are obligated to do the right thing and to speak truth to power. Faculty salaries has never been an issue in this confrontation. You ought to be ashamed of yourself for making these rather vulgar baseless accusations. I really feel sorry for you and all others who might share your opinions.

 
At 8:20 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Not sure why "Thomas Paine" is allowing anonymous posts, especially from cowards who are calling Pace Administrators "bordering on criminal"? Why not identify yourself? What are you afraid of?

 
At 8:30 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

taking credit for the work of others is a crime

 
At 8:39 AM, Blogger Thomas Paine said...

Annonymous 8:20,
Isn't it ironic how an objection to annonymous posts is being posted by an annonymous? Go figure.

 
At 10:36 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Since it seems obvious that the faculty won't rest until Caputo is removed, shouldn't we all ask what's next? It's highly unlikely that the next President would work for less, or that he or she would cut the budget for the President's office. Indeed, forcing Caputo out will make replacing him very undesirable - who wants to lead a struggling university when the faculty can fire you at any time for any reason? In all probability, Pace will have to hire a "turnaround" artist, who won't be very interested in listening to faculty. Frankly, if he or she succeeds, then she won't need to listen to faculty because she'll be invulnerable. If history teaches us anything, it teaches us that deposing a leader rarely - if ever - achieves the desired objective. One can agree or disagree with Caputo's vision, but unless & until the faculty offers a better vision, this whole dispute seems more like personal pique than principle. My guess, if you succeed in forcing Caputo from office, you'll be writing much the same things about his successor in a few months. Oh, one last thing - do you think our donors will be glad to see Caputo go? Or do you think - as I do - that fundraising will grind to a halt as people wait to see what develops?

 
At 10:50 AM, Blogger Thomas Paine said...

Annonymous 10:36 am,
I want to make sure that I understand you correctly. Are you suggesting that those who fail should not be held accountable because of the fear that they might be replaced by others that are even less qualified? What a recipe for disastour!!!

 
At 10:58 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Response to what The administrator anonymous at 10:36 said:

The presumable administrator who just wrote in strong support of the president has some seemingly valid points to contemplate on…

Basically this fellow states, is that true there was no output form the helm in six years, as well be miraculously some tangible output out of him. S/he better come to his/her senses and realizes that the endowment is anything has gone down by 50% in real valuation during Caputo’s reign. The endowment must be three times our annual budget, that is nearly one billion dollars whereas we only stand at the meager one-tenth of that, even if that, at least on the paper. With the exception of very few on the Board (e.g. Goldstein’s and Seidberg’s), the rest including Bianco remain totally Blanked =bianco out when it comes to giving or being competently and ethically knowledgeable about Pace. So, I do know my IQ is only a meager 175 but can not understand what this puppet talk about?

Josef Immoaralle

 
At 11:03 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"At 8:39 AM, Thomas Paine said...
Annonymous 8:20,
Isn't it ironic how an objection to annonymous posts is being posted by an annonymous? Go figure."

Figure this: the 8:20 AM "anonymous" post wasn't accusing anybody of being a criminal - the 6:13 AM "anonymous" post (which has since been removed by common sense) was so suggesting.

So no irony - just a challenge to the coward who accused some specific and named members of the administration of being "border-line criminal"...

 
At 11:22 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Folks, Remain level headed, objective and FOCUSED,

I do understand-- but do NOT empathize nor do I see it justified, the fact that the administrators, from the helm down to associate deans, executive directors, and even some unaccomplished departmental chairs, do see their lucrative salary and expense accounts in serious jeopardy.

A back of an envelope calculation would easily put the amount of funds, direct and indirect to have maintained the above positions, that is, president’s office and his 16 Vice Presidents, six deans, each with up to seven assoc/asst. deans, etc. amounts to no less than $50 million dollars. Now, could the J. Immorales, who introduced us to ASSessment, tell us if the impact of these offices measures up to the amount of expenditures? !

 
At 11:24 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

It's always amusing to hear people who insist upon tenure for themselves demanding that others be held accountable! The point here is that you want the Board to fire Caputo, but you can't articulate a compelling vision for the post-Caputo era. (Increasing the faculty's power is a compelling vision if and only if you're part of the faculty.) Consequently, it shouldn't be surprising that the Board didn't follow your lead. Assuming arguendo that Caputo has been a disaster, who do you want to replace him? And what do you want his replacement to do...serve at the pleasure of the faculty?

 
At 11:37 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

no assuming he was and is a disaster!!!!

 
At 11:55 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

A transition committee comprised of exemplary faculty members due to their all out performance, super staff, students and alumni, will run the university for a short period. The Board will make Caputo the ceremonial chancellor at one-third his current salary as we once had in the late 80’s for a short period. Through and orderly process, a suitable internally preferred candidate, but also externally qualified candidate, a replacement at half the cost will be made.

 
At 11:59 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thomas,
Anonymous 5:50 here - While you may wish to have others see me as "naieve" I believe that I have actually hit on a kernel of truth. I have read your blog since it's 1st week and I believe almost none of 'noble' sentiments expressed by the various bloggers. When you work at Pace long enough, you learn to recognize B.S. no matter the forum.

I also join with Anonymous 11:24 and ask you for your plan. What is your vision? What realistic alternatives do you propose? Notice I wrote realistic.

And finally, since we all know that your real name is not Thomas Paine, just as mine is not Anonymous 5:50, should either of us be critcizing others for hiding their identities? I believe we all need the safety of the shadows on this blog so I propose that we all agree to drop that subject.

 
At 12:16 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

vision a balanced budget everything else is secondary.

 
At 12:17 PM, Blogger avgjoey said...

learning is the game of the game, not personal and institutional grandeur!!!

 
At 12:21 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

No Second Chance

 
At 12:23 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"The secret of managing is to keep the guys who hate you away from the guys who are undecided."

 
At 12:27 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"I stayed up last night and watched the Republican Convention all night long.
I watched all of them talk, and listened to them and seen them and I'm not interested in politics.
If you watch them and listen to them you can find out why you're not."

 
At 12:29 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anonymous 11:24 here. Somewhere on Pace Plaza, a vendor cries, "College Presidents. Get your College Presidents here. Half off. Buy one, get one free!" Your compelling vision for the post-Caputo era is a fifty-percent discount! Gee, now I really can't imagine why the Board didn't buy into your vision! Hate to break it to you, but we could replace the current faculty with cut-rate professors and save even more. [Turns out there's lots of unemployed PhDs in NYC who'd work for less than our current faculty.] We're supposed to be a great university, but you'd rather be the Wal-Mart of higher education. [Squeeze the help hard enough, and we could run this place really, really cheaply, but who wants education by the lowest bidder?] By the way, your president-by-committee idea isn't going to attract strong applicants and/or encourage our donors to give. At best, you're proposing regicide followed by a difficult regency. [In case you don't remember your history classes, regencies almost always end in disaster.] Folks, Cromwell killed Charles I, but the English monarchy is still around. Without a real plan (other than searching for the lowest bidder), you're doomed to fail & you're very likely to damage Pace severely in the process. I'll let you in on a dirty little secret - the real $ in higher ed comes from crushing the faculty, not catering to it. If the Board wanted to fix our budget problems, it could sell underutilized assets (ie. Pleasantville campus) & close our unprofitable divisions (ie. eliminating majors with the fewest students) & reduce our costs (ie. replace tenured faculty w. adjuncts). Given these realities, I really don't think you want to make "cost savings" the centerpiece of your vision.

 
At 1:05 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

3 blind mice

 
At 1:11 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I really appreciate reading all of these very passionate responses; each makes most cogent points that are worthy of further discussion.

BUT.....

the fact of the matter is that if Dr. Caputo were a C.E.O. of a public corporation he would be removed of his duties immediately. His response to the F.C. resolutions contains a number of admissions of failures that have caused major harm to the University. His goals as defined by his own strategic plan and vision have not been achieved.
I do agree that options are not plentiful with respect to a replacement: events and outcomes probably preclude the immediate employment of a suitable replacement. Nevertheless, I do believe that the President's responses to the current crises (of his own making) are woefully inadequate; falling back on irrelevant governance matters and that tried-and-true not-for-profit bormide of "let's form a committee." What is needed now are measures to balance the budget (required) and an articulation as to how that is to be accomplished. Anything less than this is doomed to fail. All members of the so-called community, including the exhalted V.P.'s, have a stake in this if for no other reason than to afford them a heads-up as to what will befall them. The President's response tells us that all of this will be known soon; let's hope so. I would hope that this review would also include a realistic forecast of future enrollments that most certainly do not look very promising.
A couple of more comments: Anonymous 12:29 writes that "if the Board wanted to fix our budget problems..." Say what???? This suggests, of course, that the Board does not want to "fix" the budget, thereby abdicating their fiduciary responsbilities as members of a not-for-profit board (I can only hope that they are reading this blog). Second point: Caputo writes: "The Board has indicated that its compensation decisions for 2006-2007 were the result of a fair and equitble approach to setting the compensation and thus does not require review." This further suggests that the Board did not take any measures of merit and performance in their review.
My goodness!

 
At 1:28 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

if he never received another raise he would still be overpaid!!!

 
At 1:29 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

thomas....you must expose their pre pace friendship

 
At 2:13 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anonymous 1:11 has a good point about some careless drafting in my previous post. When I said, "If the Board wanted to fix our budget problems," I should have said, "If all the Board wanted to do was fax our budget problems." My point is that fixing Pace's financial issues is actually quite simple: for-profit education mills have proven that making money in higher ed is easy, the trick lies in providing a high quality education at a reasonable price. Folks, Pace could become a cash cow overnight, but I don't think any of us would be proud of this University after it became the University of Phoenix-East. In the final analysis, our budget problems are insignificant - the real issues are what kind of University do we want to be, & how do we get there? I've heard lots of criticism of Caputo's vision, but I haven't heard a viable alternative. Remember the conspirators who murdered Caesar to save the Republic? They didn't take the time to identify a viable alternative, so they wound-up killing the Republic too. Or - if you like recent history - look at our ill-fated attempt to remove Saddam Hussein. Wouldn't a little pre-war planning have come in useful? Whatever you think of Caputo, you need to realize that things could be much, much worse.

 
At 7:01 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Please pardon me for being off topic:
Ivan Fox, Rest in Peace....
"The face of Pace."

(and a great deal of its soul,too)

 
At 7:28 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Apathy is the lack of emotion, motivation, or enthusiasm. Apathy is a psychological term for a state of indifference — where an individual is unresponsive or "indifferent" to aspects of emotional, social, or physical life. Clinical apathy is considered to be at an elevated level, while a moderate level might be considered depression, and an extreme level could be diagnosed as a dissociative disorder. The physical aspect of apathy associated with physical deterioration, muscle loss, and lack of energy is called lethargy — which has many pathological causes as well.

Apathy can be object-specific — toward a person, activity or environment. It is a common reaction to stress where it manifests as "learned helplessness" and is commonly associated with depression. It can also reflect a non-pathological lack of interest in things one does not consider important.

Certain drugs are known to cause symptoms associated with or leading to apathy. Apathy is also very similar to laziness, and may be an extreme form of it.

 
At 5:38 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Pace Univeristy = Piggie bank

Too many little piggies feeding at the trough for way too long.

 
At 9:04 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...

Guts are a combination of confidence, courage, conviction, strength of character, stick-to-itiveness, pugnaciousness, backbone, and intestinal fortitude. They are mandatory for anyone who wants to get to and stay at the top. Our question is who has more the chairman and the king or us?

 
At 4:40 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

coward cow'ard adj.

WORD HISTORY A coward is one who “turns tail.” The word comes from Old French couart, coart, “coward,” and is related to Italian codardo, “coward.” Couart is formed from coe, a northern French dialectal variant of cue, “tail” (from Latin cōda), to which the derogatory suffix –ard was added. This suffix appears in bastard, laggard, and sluggard, to name a few. A coward may also be one with his tail between his legs. In heraldry a lion couard, “cowardly lion,” was depicted with his tail between his legs. So a coward may be one with his tail hidden between his legs or one who turns tail and runs like a rabbit, with his tail showing.

 
At 9:44 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Now that the Provost is gone - who is next??

 
At 9:53 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

When is President going to announce that the Provost has resigned as of 1/15/2007. He will return in 9 months as a faculty member.

 

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